It’s intriguing to me the plethora of commercials offering middle-aged people programs and pills that make them feel like they are 25 again (who wants to be 25 again? I was young and dumb). Or they promise to stop the signs of aging. I can’t even tell if these products are vitamins, medications or therapy. I agree that as we age things about our bodies change. Sometimes those changes mean we can’t pull an all-nighter, or after a day of yard work, we are sore in places we didn’t know we had. We pace ourselves differently. Each of us ages differently. Why are we fighting so hard to not age?

The fact of the matter is we are all aging. We are changing. It’s going to happen. The challenge isn’t to turn the clock back, it is to move forward taking care of our selves and aging as gracefully as we can. To live lives that are purposeful until our last breath. It’s too easy to let ourselves slow down. We can sit down too early and then we get stuck in routines that can be unhealthy and waste a lot of time. Parents of young children spend their days working and caring for children. That’s the season they are in. Children grow up and need less of our care. With this season, we get some of our time back. What do we do with it? Do we get sucked into reality shows and TV watching every night? That is no way to let life go. Stay engaged.

So much of what I’ve noticed about the elders in my life is that while their bodies are aging their spirit is still very alive. They get up every day and do something — go to the store, go work in the yard, they read, volunteer, spend time with friends etc. They are active. They are engaged in living. It didn’t take a pill, potion, or therapy to accomplish this active elder life. I’m not sure what to call it, other than a decision. Even when their bodies do fail their desire to keep moving, they continue to live and be as active as their bodies will allow. They know their days on this earth are waning. Instead of sitting down and waiting for their last breath, every day they get up and make the decision to DO life.

What’s your take on aging?

KK

#aarp, #elderly

 

 

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ww2Evidently the older I get the more I appreciate the stories my elders tell of life long ago.  I am blessed to have loved ones with great longevity; so there are tales from World War II and even before that are fascinating to hear.  When my mother re-married (long after I was an adult), her new husband’s mother was still alive and close to 90 years old.  Visiting her in the nursing home often meant stories of her taking the train to Chicago to see a picture show.  Her father was in the early film business.  She told the stories in such a way that I could, feel the steam from the train breaks and picture a young girl all dressed up and riding.

War isn’t a pretty thing, but there is something fascinating about the soldiers and the attitude of the 30’s and 40’s.  I don’t know if life was simpler, every generation has their challenges.  But living was different.  My father doesn’t tell many stories of his time in the service (WW2), but he did tell me that when they came home, people respected the soldiers and their service to the country.  Are we too busy to appreciate this anymore?

My father grew up in the 1920’s in a town next to the Ohio river.  He shares stories of messing around the river all afternoon with his brother; taking the trolley downtown to see a baseball game for a nickel!  How fun!

My favorite shows to watch are set in other times.  Ok, so I know these are cleaned up “Hollywood style”, but there is an element of truth to them.

Tell me your story of days gone by, did you grow up during the depression or  during economic boom in the 50’s or the free thinking days of the 60’s or the 80’s when all women wanted was a corner office?

All the best,

KK